aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (Shaun with book)
( Sep. 7th, 2015 07:25 pm)
I have read more fiction than usual this summer! The first one is one I forgot from the last entry, but the others are all since then.

David Brin, Existence )

Kathryn Immonen and Rich Ellis, Operation SIN: Agent Carter )

Ann Leckie, Ancillary Sword )

Michael Chabon, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Klay )

Tom Harper, Zodiac Station )

Andy Weil, The Martian )
I have seen a couple of mentions of this, but the best link comes from [livejournal.com profile] joonscribble: "James McAvoy and Benedict Cumberbatch join Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere" by Meredith Woerner at io9. I enjoyed the book, never saw the tv version (but heard bad things about it), and now really want to know when and how to listen to this! James McAvoy and Natalie Dormer star, with Bernard Cribbins as Old Bailey, Christopher Lee as Earl of Earl's Court (the man is 90 years old! and he just keeps going!), Anthony Head as Croup--oh, and Benedict Cumberbatch as Islington.

No wonder they're having trouble scheduling the filming of the next Sherlock series.


(I just looked up the principals from Sherlock in IMDb and found Martin Freeman will be in World's End with Simon Pegg and Nick Frost, and I want to see that already: "Five friends who reunite in an attempt to top their epic pub crawl from 20 years earlier unwittingly become humankind's only hope for survival," IMDb tells me. BC, Rupert Graves, and Louise Brealey are also keeping very busy. The surprise is not that Sherlock has been delayed but that they're still confident they can ever get all these people together at once again!)
I just remembered that I had a post that I didn't finish from the end of January. I've finished it now (I hope).


I have read five novels in the last two to three months [wrote that in late January or early Feb]—not bad, considering how busy I've been. I will try to avoid spoilers in the post, but warning: DO post spoilers for these books (and only these books) in the comments! I want to discuss them! Naturally, that means comments should be read with care.

Connie Willis: Blackout and All Clear )

Terry Pratchett, Mort )

Jemisin's Hundred Thousand Kingdoms )

Stross, The Jennifer Morgue )



Okay, that's my December-January post. Next time I post, I must remember at least these books:
Terry Pratchett, Guards, Guards!
Lois McMaster Bujold, The Sharing Knife (boy, do I have loads to say about that!)
Charles Stross, Singularity Sky (not in the Merchant Princes or Laundry series but a different series)
ETA: Catherynne M. Valente, The Habitation of the Blessed
That might be all I've read since late January/early February. I'm not sure. Oy.
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aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (Shaun with book)
( Aug. 16th, 2011 09:49 pm)
Apparently I haven't posted about books I've read since 9 March. I have now delayed so long that I'm not certain in which order I read these books, and I'm not absolutely certain that I haven't reviewed one or two of them before. I might have missed a book or two, but probably not: I could find these books because I haven't put them away. (I just put away A Mercy by Toni Morrison, which I reviewed on 31 December 2010, and Tolkien's Hobbit, which I reviewed 9 March.)

Of course, I've now spent the better part of two hours digging up the books, writing the reviews, and making appropriate links, so I remember why I don't review books very often. (See my OCD and CDO icons on my userpic page.)

I try to keep spoilers to a minimum in the main post and note spoilers so that readers can avoid them.

Dracula )
If you haven't read the real novel, I recommend it. I'm not much into horror, which you won't believe after I've finished this entry, but it's true—I've had to walk away from Harlan Ellison. (I didn't walk away from "For I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream," which I still regret.)


Pratchett's Equal Rites )
I haven't yet met a Discworld novel I wouldn't recommend.


Gaiman's Stardust )
I don't really recommend it. Read Anansi Boys instead.


Pratchett's Witches Abroad )
I repeat: I haven't yet met a Discworld novel I wouldn't recommend.

Atwood's Year of the Flood )
Edited: If you like postapocalyptic fare, you might want to read this series. Or you might not. I was thinking my own negative feelings about the book were mostly related to my general avoidance of postapocalyptic fiction, but my first two responses suggest that other weaknesses bothered other people as much or more as they bothered me.

Stross's Atrocity Archives )
If you're at all into horror, you should read this book. If you have to deal with large government bureaucracies, you also might want to read this book.
Tags:
aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (Shaun with book)
( Aug. 16th, 2011 09:49 pm)
Apparently I haven't posted about books I've read since 9 March. I have now delayed so long that I'm not certain in which order I read these books, and I'm not absolutely certain that I haven't reviewed one or two of them before. I might have missed a book or two, but probably not: I could find these books because I haven't put them away. (I just put away A Mercy by Toni Morrison, which I reviewed on 31 December 2010, and Tolkien's Hobbit, which I reviewed 9 March.)

Of course, I've now spent the better part of two hours digging up the books, writing the reviews, and making appropriate links, so I remember why I don't review books very often. (See my OCD and CDO icons on my userpic page.)

I try to keep spoilers to a minimum in the main post and note spoilers so that readers can avoid them.

Dracula )
If you haven't read the real novel, I recommend it. I'm not much into horror, which you won't believe after I've finished this entry, but it's true—I've had to walk away from Harlan Ellison. (I didn't walk away from "For I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream," which I still regret.)


Pratchett's Equal Rites )
I haven't yet met a Discworld novel I wouldn't recommend.


Gaiman's Stardust )
I don't really recommend it. Read Anansi Boys instead.


Pratchett's Witches Abroad )
I repeat: I haven't yet met a Discworld novel I wouldn't recommend.

Atwood's Year of the Flood )
Edited: If you like postapocalyptic fare, you might want to read this series. Or you might not. I was thinking my own negative feelings about the book were mostly related to my general avoidance of postapocalyptic fiction, but my first two responses suggest that other weaknesses bothered other people as much or more as they bothered me.

Stross's Atrocity Archives )
If you're at all into horror, you should read this book. If you have to deal with large government bureaucracies, you also might want to read this book.
Tags:
aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (books)
( Mar. 9th, 2011 09:06 pm)
Recently read books

I'm not sure what's most embarrassing: that an English professor reads so few books outside of her job these days, that I've already forgotten the names of characters in two of the three novels I read, or that I already can't easily lay hands on the first of the three novels I'll mention. It's somewhere in the house. We have hundreds of books. Maybe thousands.

I'll try to keep spoilers to a minimum in my reviews, but I make no promises about comments.

Neuromancer by William Gibson )

Childhood's End by Arthur C. Clarke )

The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien )
Tags:
aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (books)
( Mar. 9th, 2011 09:06 pm)
Recently read books

I'm not sure what's most embarrassing: that an English professor reads so few books outside of her job these days, that I've already forgotten the names of characters in two of the three novels I read, or that I already can't easily lay hands on the first of the three novels I'll mention. It's somewhere in the house. We have hundreds of books. Maybe thousands.

I'll try to keep spoilers to a minimum in my reviews, but I make no promises about comments.

Neuromancer by William Gibson )

Childhood's End by Arthur C. Clarke )

The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien )
Tags:
aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (Thor)
( Feb. 26th, 2011 07:44 pm)
Have you seen the preview for the ET Sequel: "ET-X" (Extended Trailer)?

Warnings: You may never see the real E.T. the same way again.
No food or drink while viewing.
NOT suitable for small children; possibly not suitable for work.
NOT REAL—there is no such sequel. Honest. I'm 98.6% sure.
Watch at your own risk! As my buddy Geoffrey would say, "Blameth not me!"

I cannot figure out how on earth the creator of this vid made it. Is it a pastiche of real movies? He has some big-name stars here!
Tags:
aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (Thor)
( Feb. 26th, 2011 07:44 pm)
Have you seen the preview for the ET Sequel: "ET-X" (Extended Trailer)?

Warnings: You may never see the real E.T. the same way again.
No food or drink while viewing.
NOT suitable for small children; possibly not suitable for work.
NOT REAL—there is no such sequel. Honest. I'm 98.6% sure.
Watch at your own risk! As my buddy Geoffrey would say, "Blameth not me!"

I cannot figure out how on earth the creator of this vid made it. Is it a pastiche of real movies? He has some big-name stars here!
Tags:
aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (books)
( Jan. 22nd, 2009 08:24 pm)
And some not-so-recent reading, just because. Book reviews with few spoilers, I hope! One question for my flist, below, on Pratchett and Discworld.

Lois McMaster Bujold )

Terry Pratchett, The Light Fantastic )

Mary Doria Russell, especially Dreamers of the Day )

Alfred Bester, The Stars My Destination )
Tags:
aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (books)
( Jan. 22nd, 2009 08:24 pm)
And some not-so-recent reading, just because. Book reviews with few spoilers, I hope! One question for my flist, below, on Pratchett and Discworld.

Lois McMaster Bujold )

Terry Pratchett, The Light Fantastic )

Mary Doria Russell, especially Dreamers of the Day )

Alfred Bester, The Stars My Destination )
Tags:
aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (Default)
( Jul. 21st, 2008 01:09 pm)
From [livejournal.com profile] rydra_wong: Tor has been giving away free SF books (downloadable, in pdf, html, or mobi form) for some time, apparently; they've extended the giveaway until Sunday, July 27. Go here to get some for yourself!
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aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (Default)
( Jul. 21st, 2008 01:09 pm)
From [livejournal.com profile] rydra_wong: Tor has been giving away free SF books (downloadable, in pdf, html, or mobi form) for some time, apparently; they've extended the giveaway until Sunday, July 27. Go here to get some for yourself!
Tags:
I suppose I shouldn't be surprised, but I am.

Quick summary (and please, someone correct me if I get this wrong): Helix, an SF magazine of which I had not previously heard, is edited by a William Sanders. Sanders sent a rejection note to a Luke Jackson, who posted the full contents on the Web. Jackson later removed the letter and apologized for having posted it, in a very strange way, and said Sanders's words were being taken out of context.

Sanders's words included:
"“most of the SF magazines are very leery of publishing anything that might offend the sheet heads” and
“You did a good job of exploring the worm-brained mentality of those people - at the end we still don’t really understand it, but then no one from the civilized world ever can - and I was pleased to see that you didn’t engage in the typical error of trying to make this evil bastard sympathetic, or give him human qualities.” (excerpts from Tobias Bucknell's page because the original post has been removed).

I am so floored that anyone would write those things, let alone in a rejection letter, that I hardly know where to start (but I'll try). One just doesn't talk about people that way! "sheet heads"? "the worm-brained mentality of those people"? Jackson insists Sanders meant only his protagonist, but the "sheet heads" are potential readers, not characters, and his protagonist is singular, so I don't think context really helps.

Much of the conversation seems to revolve around whether Jackson had any legal or ethical right to post the letter in full. To me, that seems a bit beside the point; at the very least, he had the right to post excerpts such as Bucknell includes, and some of the people addressing these "rights" seem unconcerned about the attitudes the rejection letter reveals, which I find far more frightening than the prospect of rejection letters being posted.

[livejournal.com profile] rydra_wong has a great set of links to the matter (and a somewhat related controversy over anthologies that emphasize male writers over female), in her posts for July 9 and 10.

Warning: most of her links connect to people condemning racism, but some of them quote or link to people who attack those who object to racism. Some of the language may not be work-safe, and parts are just really depressing; as I commented on one of Rydra's entries,
Neil Clarke's comment, "Dear lord, people like that do exist. I think I must live a sheltered life or perhaps I just hang out with a better quality of people" largely sums up my reaction to this whole mess....
Tags:
I suppose I shouldn't be surprised, but I am.

Quick summary (and please, someone correct me if I get this wrong): Helix, an SF magazine of which I had not previously heard, is edited by a William Sanders. Sanders sent a rejection note to a Luke Jackson, who posted the full contents on the Web. Jackson later removed the letter and apologized for having posted it, in a very strange way, and said Sanders's words were being taken out of context.

Sanders's words included:
"“most of the SF magazines are very leery of publishing anything that might offend the sheet heads” and
“You did a good job of exploring the worm-brained mentality of those people - at the end we still don’t really understand it, but then no one from the civilized world ever can - and I was pleased to see that you didn’t engage in the typical error of trying to make this evil bastard sympathetic, or give him human qualities.” (excerpts from Tobias Bucknell's page because the original post has been removed).

I am so floored that anyone would write those things, let alone in a rejection letter, that I hardly know where to start (but I'll try). One just doesn't talk about people that way! "sheet heads"? "the worm-brained mentality of those people"? Jackson insists Sanders meant only his protagonist, but the "sheet heads" are potential readers, not characters, and his protagonist is singular, so I don't think context really helps.

Much of the conversation seems to revolve around whether Jackson had any legal or ethical right to post the letter in full. To me, that seems a bit beside the point; at the very least, he had the right to post excerpts such as Bucknell includes, and some of the people addressing these "rights" seem unconcerned about the attitudes the rejection letter reveals, which I find far more frightening than the prospect of rejection letters being posted.

[livejournal.com profile] rydra_wong has a great set of links to the matter (and a somewhat related controversy over anthologies that emphasize male writers over female), in her posts for July 9 and 10.

Warning: most of her links connect to people condemning racism, but some of them quote or link to people who attack those who object to racism. Some of the language may not be work-safe, and parts are just really depressing; as I commented on one of Rydra's entries,
Neil Clarke's comment, "Dear lord, people like that do exist. I think I must live a sheltered life or perhaps I just hang out with a better quality of people" largely sums up my reaction to this whole mess....
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