The British Library is making an effort to buy the earliest extant European book: see British Library launches bid to save St Cuthbert Gospel at the BBC website. Otherwise, it will be auctioned to the highest bidder.

I wish the little video showed the manuscript text more, but it's not even a minute and a half; do take a look.
The British Library is making an effort to buy the earliest extant European book: see British Library launches bid to save St Cuthbert Gospel at the BBC website. Otherwise, it will be auctioned to the highest bidder.

I wish the little video showed the manuscript text more, but it's not even a minute and a half; do take a look.
aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (books)
( Dec. 7th, 2010 07:57 pm)
Here's an awesome little video showing a little bit of the digitization work the University of Kentucky has been doing on the St. Chad Gospels, with the cooperation of Lichfield Cathedral. It's just over two minutes. Gorgeous! Embedded video under the cut )
aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (books)
( Dec. 7th, 2010 07:57 pm)
Here's an awesome little video showing a little bit of the digitization work the University of Kentucky has been doing on the St. Chad Gospels, with the cooperation of Lichfield Cathedral. It's just over two minutes. Gorgeous! Embedded video under the cut )
aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (books)
( Apr. 28th, 2010 01:19 pm)
Watch this audio slideshow on the Parker Library from the BBC; it's a little over four minutes and gives a better look at the manuscript I used in my icon here (Parker 286—the Augustine Gospels), as well as several other manuscripts.

The Roskilde Museum has a little video of a tiny figurine they think represents Odin. I've had this up on my browser for a few days and keep meaning to spend more time puzzling out what the text around the video says, but at this rate I'll never get to it and you'll never get to see the video, so I put it up without fully having read the text. I know one bit says the piece is niello with gilding and inlay. It's about 2 cm high, and they think the birds are Odin's ravens Munin and Hugin (but you can read that without my help anyway).

ETA: Corrections from "Thor" to "Odin" thanks to [livejournal.com profile] dudethemath. I need the end of term soooo badly. . . .
aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (books)
( Apr. 28th, 2010 01:19 pm)
Watch this audio slideshow on the Parker Library from the BBC; it's a little over four minutes and gives a better look at the manuscript I used in my icon here (Parker 286—the Augustine Gospels), as well as several other manuscripts.

The Roskilde Museum has a little video of a tiny figurine they think represents Odin. I've had this up on my browser for a few days and keep meaning to spend more time puzzling out what the text around the video says, but at this rate I'll never get to it and you'll never get to see the video, so I put it up without fully having read the text. I know one bit says the piece is niello with gilding and inlay. It's about 2 cm high, and they think the birds are Odin's ravens Munin and Hugin (but you can read that without my help anyway).

ETA: Corrections from "Thor" to "Odin" thanks to [livejournal.com profile] dudethemath. I need the end of term soooo badly. . . .
aelfgyfu_mead: (helmet)
( Mar. 14th, 2010 07:33 pm)
I thought I had posted about the original find last summer, but either I failed to tag it or I simply forgot to post and thought I had (very likely).

As you'll see in the story, a mass grave was found last summer, and the murdered or executed men were thought to be Vikings. "Weymouth ridgeway skeletons 'Scandinavian Vikings'" confirms the suspicion: tests on the teeth shows at least some of the young men grew up in a colder climate than that of the UK, and died between 910 and 1030. Scholars rather want to link the apparent executions—the dead men are all young men, not armed, stripped, and killed with no signs they fought back—to the St. Brice's Day Massacre. Of course, Anglo-Saxonists also tend to be rather a cautious bunch, so no one is committing to that theory yet (as far as I know); it's just suggested at this point.
aelfgyfu_mead: (helmet)
( Mar. 14th, 2010 07:33 pm)
I thought I had posted about the original find last summer, but either I failed to tag it or I simply forgot to post and thought I had (very likely).

As you'll see in the story, a mass grave was found last summer, and the murdered or executed men were thought to be Vikings. "Weymouth ridgeway skeletons 'Scandinavian Vikings'" confirms the suspicion: tests on the teeth shows at least some of the young men grew up in a colder climate than that of the UK, and died between 910 and 1030. Scholars rather want to link the apparent executions—the dead men are all young men, not armed, stripped, and killed with no signs they fought back—to the St. Brice's Day Massacre. Of course, Anglo-Saxonists also tend to be rather a cautious bunch, so no one is committing to that theory yet (as far as I know); it's just suggested at this point.
You can read a lovely (though poorly titled, as a colleague observed) article on the wonderful Dictionary of Old English here, online at Humanities magazine. The DOE is a thing of beauty and a joy that grows with each letter we receive. Would that it were free so that I could share it with you all! Alas, it is by subscription only.

However, The MIddle English Compendium became free a couple of years ago, to my surprise and delight. One can always dream.
You can read a lovely (though poorly titled, as a colleague observed) article on the wonderful Dictionary of Old English here, online at Humanities magazine. The DOE is a thing of beauty and a joy that grows with each letter we receive. Would that it were free so that I could share it with you all! Alas, it is by subscription only.

However, The MIddle English Compendium became free a couple of years ago, to my surprise and delight. One can always dream.
[livejournal.com profile] library_keeper has an entry on the round table on Beowulf. I wish I could have attended! I have seen Benjamin Bagby perform, and I highly recommend it. I've also seen Seamus Heaney read, including from his translation of Beowulf, and while it's not the translation I recommend for getting the best sense of the poem one can get in Modern English, Heaney is well worth hearing.

The British Library has been celebrating Beowulf 1000, a thousand years of the Beowulf manuscript (give or take a couple of decades). I have a link that I have found in more than one place, http://www.bl.uk/whatson/exhibitions/beowulf/; I keep getting a "403 Forbidden" notice. Does this link work in the UK, or does anyone have a better link? Perhaps it has been taken down since I first received it? I'm a bit perplexed. I can't imagine why they'd block people outside the UK.

I did see the Beowulf manuscript once, where it sits behind glass in the British Library. They had it open to one of the illustrated pages, which meant it wasn't the poem itself, for that has no illustrations.
[livejournal.com profile] library_keeper has an entry on the round table on Beowulf. I wish I could have attended! I have seen Benjamin Bagby perform, and I highly recommend it. I've also seen Seamus Heaney read, including from his translation of Beowulf, and while it's not the translation I recommend for getting the best sense of the poem one can get in Modern English, Heaney is well worth hearing.

The British Library has been celebrating Beowulf 1000, a thousand years of the Beowulf manuscript (give or take a couple of decades). I have a link that I have found in more than one place, http://www.bl.uk/whatson/exhibitions/beowulf/; I keep getting a "403 Forbidden" notice. Does this link work in the UK, or does anyone have a better link? Perhaps it has been taken down since I first received it? I'm a bit perplexed. I can't imagine why they'd block people outside the UK.

I did see the Beowulf manuscript once, where it sits behind glass in the British Library. They had it open to one of the illustrated pages, which meant it wasn't the poem itself, for that has no illustrations.
They may have found the grave of Queen Eadgyth, daughter of Edward the Elder and granddaughter of Alfred the Great! I'll be very curious to see whether they can indeed identify the bones as belonging to someone from Wessex.
They may have found the grave of Queen Eadgyth, daughter of Edward the Elder and granddaughter of Alfred the Great! I'll be very curious to see whether they can indeed identify the bones as belonging to someone from Wessex.
aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (Shaun)
( Nov. 4th, 2009 07:50 pm)
From [livejournal.com profile] abyssinia4077, Five Questions Meme

Leave me a comment saying "Resistance is Futile."
I'll respond by asking you five questions so I can satisfy my curiosity.
Update your journal with the answers to the questions.
Include this explanation in the post and offer to ask other people questions.
Below the cut because I'm not brief )
aelfgyfu_mead: Aelfgyfu as a South Park-style cartoon (Shaun)
( Nov. 4th, 2009 07:50 pm)
From [livejournal.com profile] abyssinia4077, Five Questions Meme

Leave me a comment saying "Resistance is Futile."
I'll respond by asking you five questions so I can satisfy my curiosity.
Update your journal with the answers to the questions.
Include this explanation in the post and offer to ask other people questions.
Below the cut because I'm not brief )
.

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